VSX-59TXi

Elite® THX Ultra 2 7.1 Channel A/V Receiver

  • 160 Watts x 7 Channels (FTC, 6 ohms)
  • Advanced MCACC Room Calibration
  • LCD Touch Panel Remote Control

Suggested Price: $4,000.00

My A/V receiver says, "OVERLOAD" and shuts off.  What should I do?
Poor wiring connections, bad wires or a bad speaker may cause this.  As you increase the volume, you will increase the amount of current you are drawing from the receiver.  To troubleshoot this issue, try the following:

1. Disconnect each speaker wire connection. Inspect for any frayed or damaged wiring and replace it.
2. Check the impedance of the speakers; make sure they are properly rated for your stereo. In most cases, they need to be 8 ohms. Only a few Pioneer receivers will support lower impedance.
3.  If the problem still continues, try these steps:
1. Turn the receiver off.
2. Remove one speaker.
3. Turn the receiver on.
4. Increase the volume.
If the receiver overloads, repeat steps 1-4 (selecting a different speaker each time).  If you disconnect a certain speaker and the receiver no longer overloads, have this speaker checked at a service center.  It could have a bad speaker component, like a tweeter, sub-woofer, or even a bad crossover.
My A/V receiver says, "OVERLOAD" and shuts off.  What should I do?
Poor wiring connections, bad wires or a bad speaker may cause this.  As you increase the volume, you will increase the amount of current you are drawing from the receiver.  To troubleshoot this issue, try the following:

1. Disconnect each speaker wire connection. Inspect for any frayed or damaged wiring and replace it.
2. Check the impedance of the speakers; make sure they are properly rated for your stereo. In most cases, they need to be 8 ohms. Only a few Pioneer receivers will support lower impedance.
3.  If the problem still continues, try these steps:
1. Turn the receiver off.
2. Remove one speaker.
3. Turn the receiver on.
4. Increase the volume.
If the receiver overloads, repeat steps 1-4 (selecting a different speaker each time).  If you disconnect a certain speaker and the receiver no longer overloads, have this speaker checked at a service center.  It could have a bad speaker component, like a tweeter, sub-woofer, or even a bad crossover.